MOJO SPECIAL LIMITED EDITION / Jun.2004

Interview : David Sheppard / Translated by : Ms.fumu, banana co. & Makio


He's been blamed for destroying The Smiths. But Johnny Marr has never regretted leaving. Now he looks back at joy, Friendship and a secret reconvening in the '90s.

Is Johnny Marr of The Smiths a person you recognise?

Yes. My motivations have been consistent since I was 11 years old.It started even earlier with Marc Bolan and T.Rex doing Metal Guru on Top Of The Pops. It just had this kind of transcendent quality for me that could never be matched by drugs, sex or religion. From that age, searching for that feeling became my raison d'etre.I've been lucky enough to be able to conjure up those moments for other people-though primarily for my mates and myself. that's the Johnny Marr I was as a kid and that's the Johnny Marr I am today.

What would you say was The Smiths' biggest achievement?

Getting into the mainstream without compromising what we were, where we'd come from or our agenda as writers and musicians. Looking back, I think we definitely changed music, for the better. There were so many plaudits flying about at the time that it wasn't something I was ever particularly conscious of. The closest I got was knowing that other bands actually wanted to be us.That kind of ego-boost will fill you up plenty. But it's small change compared to the feeling of being in the studio at half-two in the morning when two chords suddenly crash beautiflly into each other, or an overdub creates some sublime accident and you're punching the air in celebration. That's a real sense of achievement.

It's easy to do rock with guitars, harder to do pop. The Smiths did both. How?

I consider myself a fan of pop, It's just that when I was 11 pop was invested with a different kind of energy. When you were watching Top Of The Pops you were seeing guys who looked like they hadn't been to bed for a couple of days. In the early 70's there were records in the charts like Wishing Well by Free, or Procol Harum's Conquistador, which was insane but still got played on the radio. I feel lucky to have grown up at that time because that Wagnerian sense of endeavour in the recording studio was at its height. It was something Morrissey and I always shared, the idea of pop records as these three-minutes symphonies.

You met Morrissey as a teenage and he was four years your senior. Did you really have much in common?

Yes. It felt like there was no one else on the planet that had the same reasons and values as we did when it came to music. We were both hearing little things in records that we imagined no one else would get-and that possibly weren't even there in the first place.

Such as?

Bob & Marcia's Young, Gifted And Black was one. It had this incredible sense of beauty and yearning, an emotional quality that was neither up nor down. We heard things like that in everything from Marianne Faithfull to Roxy Music and even Chicory Tip. Then there were the '60s girl groups. I was into The Ronettes and Shangri-Las and Morrissey was big on the Marvelettes and The Crystals. The girl groups became a really important bond. We'd got into them independently by reading what David Johansen and Patti Smith said about them in interviews. We approached music in odd ways like that.

Smiths lore has it that you went uninvited round to Morrissey's house in Stretford to cajole him into starting a band. Is that really how you first met?

No. We had been introduced, though we hardly spoke to each other. I'd stood with him and about four other people at a Patti Smith concert but I don't think he really noticed me, to be honest.

Talk us through the first meeting proper.

My first words were pretty much : "I've come to form the greatest band in the world..." I was deadly serious. I think it helped that I was wearing vintage Levi's and Wild One Motorcycle boots. Had I been wearing loon pants and a Wigan Casino vest it might have been different-or, then again, maybe not. He seemed interested but I wanted to know if he was serious, so I waited to see if he would call me the next day at the shop where I worked-and he did. The day after that he came round to my rented attic and we started writing songs.

What was the very first song you composed together?

The first afternoon we got together we wrote The Hand That Rocks The Cradle and Suffer Little Children.He had the lyrics typed up, so I played guitar with them between my knees. The chords just sort of poured out. Morrissey was smiling and nodding at every change. We were off then, we had a process. What Difference Does It Make, Handsome Devil,Miserable Lie and These Things Take Time were all written exactly like that.

If I'd asked you in 1982 what your band sounded like, what would you have said?

I'd probably have prattled on about girl groups, or Patti Smith, though in reality we didn't sound anything like that. That first demo was very slow and quite heavy, actually. I'd have invited you down to X clothes where I worked. I used to play it on a loop, very, very loud. I'd wait till the shop filled with all these Banshees fans and Throbbing Gristle devotees over from Sheffield for the day and just crank it up.

When was it first apparent that the band was destined for greatness?

John Peel's reaction was one of the first confirmations that we had something special.The importance of The John Peel Show to The Smiths can't be overemphasised,actually. Around the same time Peel was playing Hand In Glove we did our second ever gig at the Hacienda, which got this manifesto-like review in the NME. Everything just fed everything else from there, really.

On a basic level, it must have been a hugely thrilling time...

Most days we'd jump in our little van and go off to do a gig somewhere, buying 100 quid's worth of flowers on the way. There'd be news everyday too - Seymore Stein liked the band, Sire wanted to sign us. Radio 1 were going to give us a daytime play, I was buying a Rickenbacker...Really fucking exciting. We all piled in a van, there were no windows or seats - just a mattress. We filled it full of fags, joints and laughter. We had the same humour, the same impenetrable lingo - this truncated kind of English made up of obscure bit of the Young Ones, Beatles documentaries and other nonsense.

It's difficult to picture Morrissey in that kind of enviroment.

People get the wrong impression. He was different, of course he was, but we were a real band. When you're driving back from Carlisle at half-five in the morning in a smelly van, day in, day out for months, It's impossible to remain aloof. We were all very tight as people, Morrissey included.

Your first Top Of The Pops appearance must have had real significance.

It was a really big deal. Though my memory of it is how cold, dark and scruffy the studio was and how laughable the audience was, doing this super-stylised BBC version of Morrissey's moves. One of my daily concerns at that time was to avoid falling over - all the gladioli made stages incredibly slippery and I was favouring these moccasins that had practically no sole whatsoever. If you ever see a tape of us doing This Charming Man you'll see I'm standing rooted to the spot.

What are your favourite Smiths' songs?

All the songs liked best would start with an outro and I would just build the song backwards from that. That Joke Isn't Funny Anymore was one of those. Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me is another. Shoplifters Of The World Unite was great - that was an interesting bombshell to drop. Bigmouth Strikes Again - I had to fight to get that released as a single. Shakespeare's Sister, cos it's insane. That was one both Morrissey and me really loved. My favourites are all the ones that did really poorly...

What about the first Smiths single, Hand In Glove?

That song came about when I was round my parents' house one Sunday evening. I started playing this riff on a crappy guitar I kept there. Angie - who's now my wife - was with me and she kept saying."That's really good!" I was panicking because I had nothing to record it on, so we decided to drive to Morrissey's, because he had a tape recorder.I sat in the back of the car playing the riff over and over so I wouldn't forget it. On the way, as is her want. Angie kept saying,"Make it sound more like Iggy". Iwas just hoping Morrissey would be in. Well, I Are knew he would be, he was always in. When we got there he was a bit taken aback, it hadn't been arranged and it was a Sunday night-unheard of! He let me in and I played the riff and he said,"That's very good". About five days later we were rehearsing and Morrissey wanted to play the song. When we heard the vocals to that we were all like,wow...From then on it was always going to be the first single.

Are there any of the songs that you particularly dislike?

Barbarism Begins At Home is a bit naff. I don't like the tune - there's no emotion in it. Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now is a period piece to me. It's probably a lot of people's introduction to this strange band with the flowers or whatever, but as a musical experience I'm not that keen on it. Ask is also a little slight.

Things seemed to get darker for the band after Andy Rourke's drug problems. Was the pressure mounting by then?

Yes, it got progressively heavier from Meat Is Murder onward. We were getting bigger with each release and there was more at stake. We'd started as this threadbare little DIY family and it was very handle-able, but by The Queen Is Dead we were a big deal. There was this ongoing conflict with Rough Trade that we didn't quite understand and a lot of expectation:bigger gigs, American tours and so on. Andy's problems were heavy but as a band I knew we were entering a new and very different landscape - which we probably needed to do at the time.

Morrissey made you fire a succession of managers, which ultimately led to the disintegration of the band. What was his problem?

I don't know exactly. It may have been a control issue, it might have been personal. I would always stand behind his decision. If he wasn't happy, he wasn't happy. And it worked both ways. One time I got absolutely soaked by a bunch of pillocks in the crowd at Reading and I said I'm never playing here again and Morrissey supported that completely. That's the way it worked.

You must have resented Morrissey's vacillations, though? You even ended up managing the band yourself...

I didn't resent it as such. I'd taken on the responsibility willingly. I did resent the guy at Rough Trade ringing up when I was trying to record Andy's bass overdub on The Boy With The Thorn On His Side, just to tell me that Salford Van Hire were about to sue us over an unpaid bill. I couldn't believe it;I'd composed the music, was trying to produce the track and all this shit is going on. I just went ballistic.

What was the final nail in the coffin of The Smiths?

There wasn't one incident. The band had burnt inself out, musically and personally, by the end of Strangeways... When the friendship goes, that's it. Game over. The end was in sight when we were booked to start shooting this video in Brixton and Morrissey failed to show. Had he phoned me and said,"I'm not into doing this", then it might have been different. But he didn't. I'd been thinking about leaving the band for a year or more. Morrissey had intimated something similar when we were touring the US - saying how we were already bigger there than Roxy Music or T.Rex had ever got and that he felt uneasy about it. I talked to Morrissey and said if we stop, even just for a break. I could see a huge weight being lifted from our shoulders. I meant it as an act of love - I would never just do a bunk on my mates. In the end it simply boiled down to them not letting me have a holiday, which is pretty fucking stupid.

If your current(and Oasis) manager Marcus Russell had managed The Smiths, might the band still be together?

No. In truth, after 70-odd songs, hundred of gigs, countless amaging highs and a few low-to-middlings, it had just run its course. The friendships had all become very weird by the end. It was absolutely right time to split up. The Smiths are a band that people hold in tremendous affection but would they if we'd carried on? There was a huge chunk of music that came after us that was utterly necessary that would have made us look like The Beach Boys in our blue and white striped shirts. As I said to the band in the last weeks, it really felt like we needed to rethink what we were doing.

Did you have any idea how the band might have developed?

I wasn't trying to turn us into Kraftwerk! I remember thinking I wanted to do something that was vaguely Scott Walker-ish. Something that we touched on in Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me - something removed from the rock'n'roll combo type thing.

What are your thoughts about the 1996 cort case now?

It was horrible. I didn't even respect my own side. No one came out of that as the moral victer, really - and it just compounded the dysfunctional reputation of the group. it just guaranteed that all the great stuff about the band would be pushed further into the background - which is not how it should be.

Do you keep in contact with morrissey?

Not much. There's not really been any need to. We communicated a fair bit last summer, by fax mostly. I've no idea where his head's at corrently, to be honest. I still have a lot of respect for him but we live completely different lives. what's often overlooked is that Andy Rourke and I were actually best mate for years - I knew him from school. Obviously Morrissey and I were partners and we had the more intense relationship, but Andy and I were very close and the fact that I don't communicate with him anymore is pobably the more mournful situation.

Is a re-formation completely implausible?

Morrissey asked me to do a farewell gig at one point, but I said no. It just seemed like a bad idea. I did get us together before the court case, but not becouse of it. It was Chrissie Hynde's recommendation, becouse she's smart and she thought a relationship that had been so important shouldn't be left unresolved. We actually got together a few times. We went for a walk in the country, we went out to dinner one night and later we just went for a long drive. It was really good to see each other away from any scenes. Like everyone, in private we're quite different characters. I know the real Morrissey and he know the real me. Musically, of course. we were in completely different places by then. I was doing Electronic and our mutual points of reference had gone, or been put away for a bit, at least.

What did you think of "Viva Hate"?

It was weird for me to hear something that sounded like what we were doing but without me in it. I didn't think it was that great, nor was it awful. Frankly, I just didn't want to hear that kind of music at that particular time. I was more likely to be driving around in the sunshine listening to Donovan. I wasn't poring over the lyrics or playing it backwards for hidden messages.

Knowing what you know, what would you have done differently?

I would have got a signed agreement from the word go, so we were all aware of the financial situation. Apart from that, I wouldn't have changed anything. All the drama simply informed the music. And even when things were incredibly fraught, there were always amazing highs in between. It was all part of this feeling of walking three feet off the ground - something Morrissey and I had been doing since we'd met. I wouldn't want to go back and change any of that passion or energy.

What was The Smiths' legacy?

We difinitely changed people's lives - I've seen the evidence; people who've come over to England from Japan because of The Smith, people who've found the confidence through our music to become photographers, writers or whatever. All that's beyond my comprehension, to be honest.You have to remember that my initial ambition was to get a 45rpm record with my name on the label; from then on I didn't have a map. I know we made a huge impression on the next generation of musicians. Ed O'Brien from Radiohead sat me down a couple of years ago in a barn. on top of a moutain in New Zealand and played me the then unreleased Knives Out. It was an unbelievable experience; I was beyond flattered and quite speechless - which takes some doing. He explained to me that with that song they'd tried to take a snapshot of the way I'd done things in The Smiths - and I guess you can hear that in it.

Tell us a funny story about Morrissey.

I remember one time - the only time actually - I made a quizzical comment about Morrissey's lyrics. We were driving back from Amazon studios in Liverpool, having just finished recording The Headmaster Ritual.I put it to him that the line, "Bigger than dinner plates" should really be, "Big as dinner plates". An eyebrow was very definitely raised at this point and he went away to mull it over. When we reconvened 24 hours later he said he'd given it a lot of thought and was very impressed with my observation. Of course, he then proceeded to do sod all about it! I suppose, in a way, we both got to win. Read into that what you like...


作業工程

彼はこれまでスミスを崩壊させたとして非難され続けてきた。しかしジョニー・マーはそれを全く後悔していない。今彼は、友情そして90年代の秘密の再結集の事を楽しそうに振り返る。

スミスのジョニー・マーであるという認識はありますか?

ああ、11歳の頃から僕のやるぞという気持ちはずっと一貫してるよ。Top Of The Popsでマークボラン&T.Rexがメタル・グルーを演奏するより早かったね。それはドラッグや性的な事や宗教なんかじゃ絶対に得られない、僕にとってはまさにこれぞ!という性質を持ったものだったんだ。その頃からその感覚を探す事が僕の存在理由になったよ。そういう瞬間を他の人に呼び覚ます事が出来るなんて、僕はずっとラッキーだった。第一に自分の仲間とか自分自身の為だけどね。ジョニー・マーはまるでキッズのようで、そしてそれは今日のジョニー・マーなんだよ。

スミスが成した一番の偉業とは?

妥協なしにメインストリームに参入するにあたって僕達がどうだったかって言うと、僕達の成り立ちから作詞家と作曲家みたいな議題になるかなんだけど。振り返るに、僕達は確実に音楽をより良く変えていったと思うよ。拍手が予期せぬ場面で飛んできたり、他のバンドが僕達みたいになりたがってるのも知ってたけど、これって自我を肥えさせるってだけでね。スタジオで午前も半分過ぎた頃に突然2つのコードが美しくぶつかりあった瞬間とか、重ねた音が荘厳なアクシデントを生み出したとか、そんな時は空をパンチしちゃうだろ?それが本当の達成感てやつなのさ。

ギターでロックをやるのは簡単ですが、ポップスをやるのはより難しいものです。スミスは両方のことが出来ていましたが、どのような方法だったんですか?

僕は自分のことをポップスファンだと思ってるよ。僕が11歳の頃、ポップスは僕に今までとは違うエネルギーを与えてくれたんだよ。トップオブザポップスには何日間も眠ってないんじゃないかっていうようなスゴイ連中が出てたのさ。70年代初め、当時としては全く普通じゃなかったんけれど、今でもラジオでかかったりするような曲がヒットチャートに入ってたんだ。フリーのウィッシングウェルとかプロコル・ハルムの征服者なんかがね。僕がその時代に成長することができたのはラッキーだったね。なぜって当時のレコーディングスタジオではワーグナー的感覚がとても重視されていたんだよ。それは3分間の交響曲として存在するポップス、という考え方において僕とモリッシーが常に共有していた感覚だったのさ。

貴方がモリッシーに会った時、貴方は19歳で彼よりも4歳年下でしたね。実際に共通項などあったんですか?

あったよ。音楽的な事に関しては僕達以外、同じ動機やら価値観を持った人間はこの惑星上ではいないんじゃないかって感じた。僕達はふたりとも、まず他の誰も手を出さないようなレコードばっかり聴いてたし。

具体的にどんな?

ボブ&マーシャの”Young, Gifted And Black”とか。それは凄まじいほどの美と切望の感覚とアップでもダウンでもない情緒ってやつを持っていたんだ。僕達は同様にマリアンヌ・フェイスフルからロキシーからチコリー・チップまで聴いていた。で、60年代のガール・グループさ。僕はロネッツとシャングリラズに夢中で、モリッシーはといえばマーヴェレッツとかクリスタルズの大ファンだった。ガール・グループは重要な結束力を生んだね。僕達は独自にデヴィッド・ヨハンセンやパティ・スミスのインタビューなんかで彼らの事を知ったんだ。そんな風に奇妙なやり方で音楽に取り組んでいたんだ。

あなたがストレットフォードのモリッシーの家に押しかけ、彼を巧く丸め込んでバンドがスタートしたというのがスミス誕生の定石でしたが、本当にそうだったのですか?

いや、全然話した事は無かったけどお互い紹介はしていた。パティスミスのコンサートで、僕は彼とあと他4人程と一緒に居た。でも彼が僕にホントに気付いてたとは思わないけどね、正直な所。

最初に会われた時の事を解るように話して下さい。

僕の最初に言った事はだいたいこんな風かな:「世界一素晴らしいバンドを作る為に来たんだ」って。死ぬ程真剣だったよ。僕が着てたのはリーバイスのビンテージものとWild Oneのバイカーブーツだったんだけど、それに助けられたなと思う。もしWigan Casino上着とちょっとまずいズボンを着ていたら違ったかもしれないし…だけどまあわからないな。モリッシーは興味を持ったように見えたけけど、僕が知りたかったのは彼がマジなのかどうかだった。僕は、彼が電話してきて次の日僕が働いている店に来るかどうか待ち・・・で、彼はそうした。その翌日にもモリッシーは僕の借りていた屋根裏にやってきて、それから曲作りは始まったのさ。

初めて一緒に書いた曲は?

僕らが会って初めての午後、一緒に”ゆりかごを揺らす手”と”サファー・リトル・チルドレン”を書いた。僕は奴がタイプした歌詞を膝に挟んでギターを弾いた。コードは自然に流れ出てくるみたいだった。転調の度にモリッシーは微笑んだりうなずいたり、で、ちょっと休んだり・・・っていうプロセスだった。まさにそうやって出来たのが”ワット・ディファランス・ダズ・イット・メイク”とか”ハンサム・デビル”、”ミゼラブル・ライ”、”ジーズ・シングズ・テイク・タイム”ってわけさ。

もし1982年にあなたのバンドがどんな風な音楽をやってたか例えてもらうとどう言ったと思いますか?

多分僕はパティ・スミスとかガールズバンドについての無駄話をしてたと思うね。実際の僕らの音楽がそんな風なものじゃなかったとしてもね。ほんとに最初のデモはとてもゆっくりでヘヴィだったんだ。僕は君を僕が働いてたXクローズに連れて行っただろうね。僕らはそのデモを何度もでっかい音でくりかえし演奏していたんだ。シェフィールドからやってくるバンシーズファンやスロビング・グリッスルのファンで店が満杯になるのを一日中待ってから始めていたんだよ。

バンドがビッグになる運命を感じた最初の兆候はいつだったんですか。

ジョン・ピールの反応は最初の確信のひとつだったよ。それは何か特別なものだったね。実際ジョン・ピール・ショウで重要だったのはスミスへの偏見を持たれなかったことだったんだ。僕らがハシエンダでやった2度目のギグがNMEでマニフェストみたいなレヴューを書かれていたちょうど同じ時期に、ピールはハンドイングローヴをかけてくれていたんだ。本当にすべてはそこから始まったんだよ。

そんな基礎的な段階で、それはそれは恐ろしくスリリングだったんじゃないですか?

大抵、僕らは小さいバンでギグに乗り込んでいった。道すがら、100ポンド分の花を調達してね。毎日なんらかのニューズがあって − サイアのセイモア・スタインは僕達を気に入って契約したがった。レディオ・ワンは昼間ギグをやらせてくれたし、僕はリッケンバッカーを買っちゃった。マジで腸エキサイティングだったな。窓も椅子もなくマットレスだけのバンの中で、バンドやアクタモクタ取り巻きたちが皆積み重なるようにしてたよ。僕達はわけわかんないような同じユーモアを持ってたんだよ。この、ビートルズのドキュメンタリーやなんやらみたいな馬鹿馬鹿しさの切り詰め感コトバが若者特有って感じの曖昧さを形成しているな。

そんな環境でモリッシーは大丈夫だったんですか・・・

みんな彼を誤解しているよ。彼はそんなじゃないって言うか・・・まあそうなんだけど。僕達は真のバンドだったんだって。来る日も来る日もカーライルから朝っぱら2時間半も臭うバンの中で何ヶ月も過ごしたんだよ?そんな状況で離れているのは不可能だって。モリッシーだって同じようにキツい思いをしていたんだよ。

最初のトップ・オブ・ザ・ポップスはかなりの意義があったんじゃないですか?

そりゃ大仕事だったよ。思い出されるのは、スタジオの寒さと暗さと薄汚さ、お客の滑稽さ、それにBBCお決まりのモリッシーの動きだよ。僕の日々の悩みのひとつは、いかにステージでコケないようにするかって事で・・・だってステージはグラジオラスでスバラしく滑りやすくなってるわけさ。僕が気に入っていたモカシンは靴底なんて全く無かったからね。”ディス・チャーミング・マン”をプレイしているビデオを見れば、僕が一ヶ所で踏ん張ってるのがわかるよ。

あなたが気に入っているスミスソングは何ですか?

あらゆる曲で好きなのものは皆アウトロからスタートしていて、僕は曲を後方から組み立てて行ったんだ。”That Joke Isn't Funny Anymore”はその一つだったな。”Last Night I Dreamt 〜”だってそうさ。”Shoplifters Of The World Unite”はもう最高だしあれは興味深い問題提起だったっていえる。シングルのリリースで奮闘しなくちゃいけなかった”Bigmouth Strikes Again”も。”Shakespeare's Sister”は正気の沙汰じゃない代物だった。モリッシーにも僕にも本当に愛されてたナンバーだったね。僕の気に入ってる曲はどうも皆セールス的にイマイチだったな・・・。

スミスのファーストシングル「ハンドイングローブ」についてはどうですか?

その曲はある日曜日の夕方、僕が両親の家付近にいた時、そこで適当にこのリフを弾いてみたんだ。その時現在の僕のワイフであるアンジーが一緒にいてさ、「それ凄くいいわ!」って言ったのさ。僕は慌てたよ、だって録音するものを何も持ってなかったからね。そこでテープレコーダーを持ってるモリッシーの家に行くことにしたんだ。僕は車の後部座席に座ってそのリフを忘れないように何度も何度もくりかえし弾いてたよ。途中で彼女は「もっとイギーっぽくしてみて」って言ってたな。僕はただモリッシーがその場にいればなあって願ってたよ。そう、彼はいるべきときにはいつもいてくれたからね。僕らがモリッシーの家に着いたとき、彼はちょっとびっくりしてたよ。日曜の夜だったし、約束もしてなかったしね。とんでもない!ってカンジでさ。彼は僕を家にいれてくれた。それで僕がそのリフを弾いたら「すごく良いね。」って言ってくれたんだ。それから5日くらい後かな、僕らがリハーサルをしていたとき、モリッシーがこの曲をやりたがったんだ。彼のヴォーカルを聴いてみたら、皆、おお、スゲー!ってカンジだったな。そのときからずっとそれをファーストシングルにするつもりだったんだよね。

では特に好きではない曲は?

”バーバリズム”はちょっとダサイかな・・・何の感情も込める事が出来なかった。”ヘヴン・ノウズ”は時代を感じさせるよね。この曲は多くの人々に、僕達が花付き珍バンドだっていう入門曲みたいになってしまったけど、音楽的見地から言っても全く好きになれないね。”アスク”も同じようにちょっとショボイね。

ロークのドラッグ問題後、段々先行きが暗くなってきたように見えます。プレッシャーも相当なものだったのでは?

ああ。”ミート・イズ・マーダー”の辺りから問題はどんどんヘヴィになったよ。僕達は作品リリース毎にビッグになっていき、色んな事が危うくなっていった。全部自分達でやるボロボロファミリーみたいにスタートして、その時点ではとてもうまく行ってたけど”クイーン・イズ・デッド”あたりからはもう問題がでかくなり過ぎた。ラフ・トレードとの諍いも止まらず・・・なんでこうなるの?って事が沢山起きたんだ。大規模ギグ、アメリカン・ツアーなどなど。アンディのドラッグ問題が酷くなる一方で僕は、バンドは新地へ踏み込み始めたと感じたし、皆も当時はそうする必要があると思っていたんじゃないかな。

モリッシーは貴方に次々とマネージャーを解雇させたわけですが結果的にはそれがバンドを崩壊へと導くことになりましたね。彼は何が気に入らなかったんです?

ハッキリとはわからないな。管理体制の問題だったかもしれないし、個人的な事だったかもしれない。僕は常に彼の決定を支持したよ。彼がハッピーじゃないっていうならハッピーじゃなかったんだよ。このやり方ってのはいい面も悪い面も両方あるよ。ある時僕はレディングで馬鹿な観客たちのせいで水浸しにされたんだ。それで僕はここでは二度と演奏しないって言ったんだけど、モリッシーは全面的に賛同してくれたんだ。この場合はこのやり方がうまく機能したってわけ。

でもあなたはモリッシーの気まぐれに腹を立てたりしたでしょう?結局あなたがバンドのマネージングをしなくちゃいけなくなったわけだし。

僕はそんな事には怒ってなかった。むしろ進んで責任を負ってたんだ。僕が腹を立ててたのはラフトレードの連中さ。奴ら僕が”心に茨を持つ少年”のアンディのベース部分をレコーディングしようとしてた時に電話してきてさ、サルフォードのレンタカー屋が料金未納で僕らを訴えようとしてる、とか言ってるんだ。信じられなかったよ、僕は曲を作ったり、プロデュース作業をしてたっていうのにそんなクソみたいな雑用までやり続けなきゃいけなかったって事がさ。もう逃げ出したくてたまらなかった。

スミスにとって命取りになったものは結局何だったのでしょう。

イッコの事が原因じゃないんだ。バンドは音楽的にも個人的にも、自らを燃やし尽くしてしまったようだった。ストレンジウェイズの終わり、友情もなくなった。それだけ。ゲーム・オーバー。”終わったな”って思ったのは、僕達がブリクストンでこのビデオ(ストレンジウェイズ)を撮影しようって時、モリッシーがこのショウをすっぽかした時だな。事前に彼は僕に、”やる気になれない”って電話してきていて、まさかな、と思ったけどマジだった。僕はもう一年以上バンドを辞める事を考え続けていたんだ。USツアーの最中にモリッシーは似たような事を仄めかした。僕達がロキシー・ミュージックやTレックスなんかよりどれだけ大きくなってしまったかって事について、不安だったように見えたよ。それで僕は彼に”解散するくらいなら休暇を取ろうよ”って言ったんだ。僕達の肩にかかる負担が大きくなる一方だったからね・・・これは一種愛情だったわけだ。ひとりで逃げるような真似はしたくなかった。まあ最後はアホくさい事かも知れないけど、単純に僕に休暇をくれなかった事で煮詰まっちゃったんだよね。

もしあなたの、そしてオアシスの現マネージャー、マルクス・ラッセルがスミスのマネージメントをしていたらスミスはまだ存続していたと思いますか?

いいや。事実として僕らは70曲あまりの楽曲を作り、山ほどギグをこなしてきたわけで。数え切れないほど素晴らしいものもあれば、並み以下なものも少しはあったけどね。それをやった後の結果がこうだったのさ。最後には友情すらまるっきりぞっとするようなものに成り下がってたんだ。あの時期に解散したのは絶対的に正しかったんだよ。スミスは皆から熱狂的に愛され続けてるバンドだよ、だけどもし僕らがバンドを続けてたら、そんな風に扱ってくれたかい?僕らの後からはいろんな音楽がたくさん出てきてたから、僕らが青と白のストライプのシャツを着た、まるでビーチボーイズみたいな位置づけにされるのは目に見えてたんだ。最後の数週間に僕がバンドに対して進言していたことだけど、僕らは自分たちがやってることを考え直す必要があるって本当に感じてたな。

あなたはバンドが発展していくためのアイデアを何か持っていたんですか?

僕は何もバンドをクラフトワークみたいにしようってわけじゃなかったよ!まあ漠然となんだけどスコット・ウォーカーっぽい何かをやりたいと思ってたのは覚えてるよ。”サムバディーラヴドミー”で僕らがやってみた感じのもので、ロックンロールコンボ的なのものを排除したような、何かそんな感じのものをね。

1996年の裁判について今のあなたの考えは?

あれは酷い体験だったなあ。僕は自分の味方を信用する事さえ出来なくなってしまったよ。倫理的な意味での勝利者なんて誰も居ないって事が明らかになったんじゃないかな。それはグループが機能障害を起こしてるって悪評をさらに酷くしてしまっただけでね。結局保証されたものなんて、バンドについての素晴らしかった事が全部後方に押しやられてしまうだろうって事だけだったんだ。全くそうされるべきじゃないのに。

あなたはモリッシーとコンタクトを取り続けているんですか?

いや全く。必要性は少しも無いからね。僕たちがまともにちょっと連絡しあったのは去年の夏の事だったよ。そのほとんどはFAXだったけど。正直言うと彼の現在の考えてる事は僕には全く分からない。僕はいまだに彼をとても尊敬してるけど、僕達はもう完全に違う人生を生きてるんだ。結構見落とされがちだけど僕とアンディは実際長い事本当に良い友達だった。僕は彼を学校の頃から知ってたからね。言うまでもなくモリッシーと僕はパートナーで、それにもっと激しい間柄だった。でもアンディと僕は竹馬の友みたいだったのに今はもう連絡を取り合う事は無いっていうのが事実で、多分それはもっと嘆かわしい状況かもしれないな。

再結成は完全に有り得ませんか?

モリッシーが解散ギグをやろうと言った時、僕は断った。酷いアイディアに思えたものさ。例の裁判の前に再会したけど、勿論その為じゃないよ。これはクリッシー・ハインドに薦められたからさ。彼女は出来た人で、関係を修復せず去るのは良くないと思ったようだ。実際、僕達は何回か一緒に過ごしたよ。ぶらぶら田舎を散歩したり、食事に行ったり、長時間ドライブさえもしたんだ。僕達がそれぞれどのシーンからも遠ざかっているって知る事が出来て良かったよ。皆と一緒で、私生活において僕達はほぼ異なった性格なんだ。僕は本当のモリッシーを知っているし、彼は本当の僕を知っている。ここへきて、音楽的には勿論完全に異なる場所にいるしね。僕はエレクトロニックをやったりして、少なくともお互い照らし合わせるような部分が段々無くなって来てるんじゃないかな。

ビバ・ヘイトについてはどう思いましたか?

自分たちがやってたような音楽を、しかも自分抜きの状態で聴くのって奇妙なものだったよ。素晴らしいとも思わなかったけど、酷いとも思わなかった。言ってしまうと、わざわざ聴きたいとも思わない音楽なわけで。陽が燦燦と照る中ドライブしながら聴きたいのはドノヴァンであって、熟考された詞の隠されたメッセージなんかじゃ決してないのさ。

貴方の知るべき事を知ったところで、何か変えられたと思いますか?

僕は書面にサインされた同意も得ていたし、みんな財政状況には気づいていたはずさ。それは別にしても、僕は何も変える気はなかった。劇的効果はシンプルに音楽だけに吹き込んだし、どえらく困難な状況だったけどそんな中でさえいつもびっくりするほどいいものが出来ていた。地面から3フィートくらい離れて歩いているみたいな気持ち・・・モリッシーと僕が出会ってからずっとそうだった。もう戻りたくないし、あの頃の情熱やエナジーの何ものも変えたくはないんだよ。

スミスが残した遺産とは何だったのでしょう?

僕たちが間違いなく人々の生活を変えたって事だね。個人的な根拠から言わせて貰うと、スミスの為に日本からイギリスへやってくる人々や僕達の音楽を心の糧にし続けて写真家や記者になるとか、色々そんな人達がいるって事だよ。心の底から思うけれどそんな事があるなんて僕の理解力をこえたものだった。君に忘れないで居て欲しいんだけど、僕の当初の野望ってものは自分の名前の刻まれた45RPMのレコードを作りたいというようなものであって、以来僕には案内図なんてなかったのさ。僕たちが深遠なる影響を次世代のミュージシャンに与えたって話は知ってるよ。数年前、ニュージーランドの山の上の物置みたいな所にレディオヘッドのエド・オブライエンが僕を座らせるんだ。するとまだリリースされてない頃の”ナイヴズ・アウト”を僕に弾いて聴かせたんだよ。信じ難い体験だった。すっかり気を良くしちゃって口を挟まずにいるには努力を要したな。彼は、”この曲は貴方がスミスで為した事を僕らなりに形にしてみたくて努力したものなんです”って僕に説明したんだ。君もそれを聴き取る事ができるだろうと思うよ。

モリッシーについて面白かった話を聞かせて下さい。

僕が覚えているのは一度だけ、ほんとに一度だけモリッシーの詞についてちょっとからかったコメントをした事があったんだ。僕らはヘッドマスターリチュアルのレコーディングを終えてリバプールのアマゾンスタジオから戻ってきたんだ。僕は歌詞の中の”ディナープレートより大きな”の所は”ディナープレートと同じくらいの”にすべきなんじゃないかと指摘したんだ。その瞬間彼の眉毛はつりあがって、その場から出て行った。そこの所をよく考え直すためにね。次の日僕らが再び集まった時に、彼はこう言ったんだ。色々よく考えてみたんだけど、ジョニーの意見にはほんとに心を動かされたよ、って。それでどうなったかって?勿論、彼は何一つ変更したりしなかったさ!まあこんな風に僕らはお互いを立ててうまくやってたと思うんだ。あとは君の想像にお任せするよ・・・


HOME  ARTICLE  WORKS

special thanx : Ms.Fumu&banana co.